Henri II Style.

Style Henri II was the name given to the nineteenth century decorative arts and architecture of the Second French Renaissance and the modern designs that mimicked the style. It is also used today to describe this rather neo-renaissance style French furniture which is vastly distributed during the second half of the nineteenth and lasted well into the twentieth.


Inspired by the shapes of the furniture and decor of the second half of the sixteenth century, the style of Henry II or Neo-Renaissance style developed in France from the reign of Louis-Philippe. The French Renaissance to the fore in the first place by the Museum of French Monuments of Alexandre Lenoir, but especially by the architect Felix Duban, finds its popularity in the nineteenth century by national origin, and it offers alternative the sacrosanct neoclassical academic standard as imposed from the Ancien Régime.

Dissemination of forms and their success are also encouraged by the current romantic and popular literary success Alexandre Dumas and Victor Hugo. It reached its peak under the Second Empire, before declining in the furniture industry. Become a style agreed at the beginning of the twentieth century, it has gradually fashioned after the First World War.

Table Henri IIPanneau en chêne sculpté Henri II

The furniture and decor resume stereotyped forms of the Second French Renaissance architectural decoration, masks, trays supported by columns ringed grotesques, acanthus leaves, wide overhanging cornices, balusters and turned figurative sculptures in bas-relief. Pediments are almost always adorned with a cartridge.

The taste is the “High time” including Middle Ages, Renaissance and the first half of the seventeenth century. The nineteenth century Henry II is also a style quite composite, according to the trend of the times eclectic, and often mixed with Renaissance forms belonging to Louis XIII style (or more rarely Louis XIV) such as twisted columns the diamond patterns and fringes on upholstered furniture. Regionalism is also present at the end of the century, with the integration of regional styles such as Basque or Breton furniture.

Style Henri II was the name given to the nineteenth century decorative arts and architecture of the Second French Renaissance and the modern designs that mimicked the style. It is also used today to describe this rather neo-renaissance style French furniture which is vastly distributed during the second half of the nineteenth and lasted well into the twentieth.
Inspired by the shapes of the furniture and decor of the second half of the sixteenth century, the style of Henry II or Neo-Renaissance style developed in France from the reign of Louis-Philippe. The French Renaissance to the fore in the first place by the Museum of French Monuments of Alexandre Lenoir, but especially by the architect Felix Duban, finds its popularity in the nineteenth century by national origin, and it offers alternative the sacrosanct neoclassical academic standard as imposed from the Ancien Régime. Dissemination of forms and their success are also encouraged by the current romantic and popular literary success Alexandre Dumas and Victor Hugo. It reached its peak under the Second Empire, before declining in the furniture industry. Become a style agreed at the beginning of the twentieth century, it has gradually fashioned after the First World War.

The furniture and decor resume stereotyped forms of the Second French Renaissance architectural decoration, masks, trays supported by columns ringed grotesques, acanthus leaves, wide overhanging cornices, balusters and turned figurative sculptures in bas-relief. Pediments are almost always adorned with a cartridge. The taste is the “High time” including Middle Ages, Renaissance and the first half of the seventeenth century. The nineteenth century Henry II is also a style quite composite, according to the trend of the times eclectic, and often mixed with Renaissance forms belonging to Louis XIII style (or more rarely Louis XIV) such as twisted columns the diamond patterns and fringes on upholstered furniture. Regionalism is also present at the end of the century, with the integration of regional styles such as Basque or Breton furniture.

Style Henri II was the name given to the nineteenth century decorative arts and architecture of the Second French Renaissance and the modern designs that mimicked the style. It is also used today to describe this rather neo-renaissance style French furniture which is vastly distributed during the second half of the nineteenth and lasted well into the twentieth.

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Inspired by the shapes of the furniture and decor of the second half of the sixteenth century, the style of Henry II or Neo-Renaissance style developed in France from the reign of Louis-Philippe. The French Renaissance to the fore in the first place by the Museum of French Monuments of Alexandre Lenoir, but especially by the architect Felix Duban, finds its popularity in the nineteenth century by national origin, and it offers alternative the sacrosanct neoclassical academic standard as imposed from the Ancien Régime. Dissemination of forms and their success are also encouraged by the current romantic and popular literary success Alexandre Dumas and Victor Hugo. It reached its peak under the Second Empire, before declining in the furniture industry. Become a style agreed at the beginning of the twentieth century, it has gradually fashioned after the First World War.


The furniture and decor resume stereotyped forms of the Second French Renaissance architectural decoration, masks, trays supported by columns ringed grotesques, acanthus leaves, wide overhanging cornices, balusters and turned figurative sculptures in bas-relief. Pediments are almost always adorned with a cartridge.

The taste is the “High time” including Middle Ages, Renaissance and the first half of the seventeenth century. The nineteenth century Henry II is also a style quite composite, according to the trend of the times eclectic, and often mixed with Renaissance forms belonging to Louis XIII style (or more rarely Louis XIV) such as twisted columns the diamond patterns and fringes on upholstered furniture. Regionalism is also present at the end of the century, with the integration of regional styles such as Basque or Breton furniture.

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